Department of Computer Science and Technology

Security Group

2018 seminars

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20 February 14:00Large Scale Ubiquitous Data Sources for Crime Prediction / Cristina Kadar, ETH Zurich

LT2, Computer Laboratory, William Gates Building

Abstract not available

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06 February 14:00Psychological predictors of risky online behaviour: The cases of online piracy and privacy / Piers Fleming, School of Psychology, University of East Anglia

LT2, Computer Laboratory, William Gates Building

Despite the real world implications of online behaviour our online actions remain highly malleable with respect to our stated preferences or contextual factors. We often act inconsistently with our own past behaviour or attitudes based upon the situation. This talk examines strong and weak predictors of piracy and privacy behaviours based on survey and experimental studies. Risk perceptions, values and personality differences are considered.

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30 January 14:00Anonymity in Cryptocurrencies / Sarah Meiklejohn, Information Security Group, University College London (UCL)

LT2, Computer Laboratory, William Gates Building

A long line of recent research has demonstrated that existing cryptocurrencies often do not achieve the level of anonymity that users might expect they do, while at the same time another line of research has worked to increase the level of anonymity by adding new features to existing cryptocurrencies or creating entirely new cryptocurrencies. This talk will explore both of these lines of research, demonstrating both de-anonymization attacks and techniques for anonymity that achieve provably secure guarantees.

Bio:

Sarah Meiklejohn is a Reader in Cryptography and Security at University College London. She has broad research interests in computer security and cryptography, and has worked on topics such as anonymity and criminal abuses in cryptocurrencies, privacy-enhancing technologies, and bringing transparency to shared systems.

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23 January 14:00The impact of cybercrime on businesses: A new conceptual framework and its application to Belgium / Letizia Paoli, Faculty of Law, University of Leuven

LT2, Computer Laboratory, William Gates Building

Despite growing indications and fears about the impact of cybercrime, only few academic studies have so far been published on the topic to complement those published by consultancy firms, cybersecurity companies and private institutes. The review of all these studies shows that there is no consensus on how to define and measure cybercrime, or assess its impact.

Against this background, this article pursues two aims: 1) to develop a well-thought conceptual framework to define and operationalize cybercrime affecting businesses as well as its impact, harms, and costs; and 2) to test this conceptual framework with a survey of businesses based in Belgium, which was administered in summer 2016 and elicited 310 valid responses.

Consisting of five types, our conceptualization of cybercrime is, unlike others, technology-neutral and fully compatible with the legislation. Drawing on Greenfield and Paoli’s (2013), we understand impact as the overall harm of cybercrime, that is, the “sum” of the harms to material support, or costs, and the harms to three other interest dimensions, i.e., functional (i.e., operational) integrity, reputation and privacy. Whereas we ask respondents to provide a monetary estimate of the costs, respondents are invited to rate the severity of the harms on the basis of an ordinal scale.

This “double track” might give a fuller assessment of cybercrime impact. Whereas most affected businesses do not report major costs or harm, 15% to 20% of them rate the harms to their internal operational activities as serious or more, with cyber extortion regarded as most harmful.