Kevin J. Heffernan

Computer Science PhD Student at the University of Cambridge

Natural Language Processing

Deep Learning

Bayesian Methods

+44 7 512 315 751
kevin.heffernan@cl.cam.ac.uk
Jesus College, Cambridge, UK
About me

Who am I?

I am a final year PhD Computer Science student at the University of Cambridge. My research focuses on using Deep Learning and Bayesian Methods for Natural Language Processing.

The main application of my research is a new task I created called Problem-solving pattern identification. This task involves first finding problem and solution statements within academic research papers and subsequently determining if identified problem and solution statements are linked together.

In contrast to my academic interests, I am also a professional musician and have played with both the Irish National Symphony and Concert Orchestras.

Experiences


PhD Intern

I will be researching and developing new deep learning models which will be integrated with the current Facebook deep learning platform for NLP applications regarding recognition of harmful content.

September - November 2019. London, UK


Summer School on Deep Learning and Bayesian Methods

Week long hands-on programme based in PyTorch which focuses on state-of-the-art bayesian methods for deep learning such as modern stochastic optimisation methods, regularisation techniques, and how to reason about uncertainty in neural networks and their predictions.

August 2019. Moscow, Russia.

Education


PhD in Computer Science

My research focuses on using Deep Learning and Bayesian Methods in NLP for a new task I created called Problem-solving pattern identification. This touches upon several traditional NLP tasks such as Named Entity Recognition, Information Extraction, and Topic Modeling.

September 2015 - Current. Cambridge, UK.

M.Phil in Advanced Computer Science

Specialization in Natural Language Processing. Examples of classes taken were Syntax and Parsing, Lexical Semantics, and Discourse Processing. I also worked on a novel NLP Information Extraction task for my dissertation.

October 2014 - June 2015. Cambridge, UK.