women@CL

Statistics

Full Statistics
Summaries
Studies and links

Full statistics

We've attempted to bring together the most relevant statistics regarding the numbers, and percentages of women in computer science at each level in education and academia.

Data is available in .html and .csv formats.

Sources for the data and short notes explaining what they mean are on each of the sheets.

Cambridge Applications and Acceptances

The first table shows the number of conditional offers made for computer science by gender. The second table also shows the acceptance rate (= number acceptances / number applied) and then the percentage of acceptances awarded to women. Note that applications to read Mathematics with Computer Science are not included.

(html)(csv)

Cambridge Student Numbers (inc. postgraduate)

These tables show the total numbers, by gender, of students in different courses in the Cambridge Computing Lab and the corresponding percentages of females, between 1998 and 2003. This includes undergraduate, diploma, M. Phil and graduate students.

(html)(csv)

Cambridge Honours Examination results

This large table gives detailed data on the number of students, by gender, year and part, gaining each class in examinations since 1998.

(html)(csv)

Summaries

Student snapshot

Total numbers of students and percentage of females at each level, by year through education levels into Cambridge.

Level 1999-00 2000-01 2001-02 2002-03 2003-04
Total Number % female Total Number % female Total Number % female Total Number % female Total Number % female
GCSE Information Technology 97963 39.7% 111890 40.3% 116033 40.7% 92054 40.3% ~ ~
A level in Computing ~ ~ 21744 22.7% 26780 25.9% 28175 26.5% ~ ~
Cambridge Undergraduates (First year CS) 106 9.4% 107 19.6% 127 11.0% 130 16.2% 105 14.3%
Cambridge Diploma Comp Sci 47 21.3% 40 15.0% 23 8.7% 33 15.2% 24 16.7%
Cambridge M. Phils 20 30.0% 18 22.2% 21 23.8% 23 30.4% 26 26.9%
Cambridge Graduate Student 56 17.9% 57 8.8% 66 7.6% 112 15.1% 123 17.1%

~ indicates that no data was available when the table was compiled.

Cambridge Applications and Acceptances

Acceptances to Cambridge Computer Science

Year Men Women  
Number Rate Number Rate % Women
2002 90 21.6% 14 26.9% 15.6
2001 96 20.9% 15 22.4% 15.6
2000 71 16.3% 17 27.0% 23.9
1999 77 20.2% 9 24.3% 11.7

This table shows the number of conditional offers made for computer science and the acceptance rate (= number acceptances / number applied) and then the percentage of acceptances awarded to women. In the past four years women have had a higher acceptance rate than men. Note that applications to read Mathematics with Computer Science are not included.

Studies and links

There have been a lot of relevant studies to anaylse the difference in education between men and women. Here are links to just a few. There are many more if you search online.

Studies (data)

Studies (reports)

  • JCAP
    The 'Joint Committee on Academic Performance' published its findings early in 2003. The report is a detailed analysis of the extent of difference in Tripos performance between different groups at the University of Cambridge and a exploration of some of the reasons behind them. There is a lot of data relating to the gender divide and some of the science subjects in particular.
    http://www.admin.cam.ac.uk/reporter/2002-03/weekly/5913/6.html
  • NSF - Report on Women and Minorities in Science and Engineering 2000
    The American National Science Federation's Report from 2000 is is the 10th in a series of Congressionally-mandated biennial reports on the status of women and minorities in science and engineering. The report documents both short- and long-term trends in the participation of women, minorities, and persons with disabilities in science and engineering education and employment. There are also many other reports on similiar topics available on this site.
    http://www.nsf.gov/statistics/nsf00327
  • The Incredible Shrinking Pipeline, Tracy Camp
    This report, published in 1997, sought to gather much of the research on the status of women in computing and the reasons behind it.
    Short survey paper: http://www.acm.org/women/documents/pipelineshrinkage.htm
    Full Report: http://www.acm.org/women/documents/finalreport.pdf