Relic Information query matches

Matching on query: Unique id = 34/97, Name = any, Associated machine = any, class = any


Unique id/year of acquisition: 34/97
Name: Ring PCB
Ring PCB
Other nos on object: none
Inscription: "Cambridge ring station data and timing ISS3", "ORBIS" (on sticker)
Dimensions: 252x185x10
Description: Rectangular green PCB with insertion strips (25) protruding from one edge. Selection of chips, a few other components. Blue 16-way ribbon cable attached on one side, power cable (2-way, 0V and +5V) soldered to rear, cut off.
Class: network
Machine: Ring
Condition: good
Notes:
DW: These are two circuit boards connected with the Cambridge ring. Later versions of the ring had more integrated circuits - in fact one circuit was designed especially by Andy Hopper to replace nearly all the chips on the previous boards. This was then possible - it was made to work but it never came into service here because it would only run safely at about 7 megahertz and not 10 megahertz mainly due to doubtful specifications by manufacturers. Both of these boards have a single chip which does the hard part of the Cambridge ring. This fat transformer is still used for generating the power supply for the board from the ring and this is a transistor and as you can see it has a large heat sink on because it handles the power to supply the rest of the board.
Q: So these boards are from the later life of the ring?
DW: When the ring was in service it was thought you could replace the entire board by a single integrated circuit which was possible. We went to an extraordinary amount of trouble. One manufacturer failed and another manufacturer refused to manufacture them, and so there was a lot of hassle and they were never really satisfactory. They turned up too late to be really useful.
Q: So these boards would date from roughly when?
DW: Probably about 2 - 5 years after the Ring started. I'm not quite sure about these. Certain manufacturers went into manufacture for Ring components and there was a specification by British standards to which they adhered.
See also: 35/97
See also: 103/99


Unique id/year of acquisition: 34/97
Name: Ring PCB
Ring PCB
Ring PCB
Group id: 2
Other nos on object: none
Inscription: "Cambridge ring - repeater ISS3","ORBIS" (on sticker)
Dimensions: 187x185x25
Description: Green PCB, variety of chips and other components inc. large transformer (?), large heat sink, plug (15-way D type), several chips.
Class: network
Machine: Ring
Condition: rear corroded
Notes:
DW: These are two circuit boards connected with the Cambridge ring. Later versions of the ring had more integrated circuits - in fact one circuit was designed especially by Andy Hopper to replace nearly all the chips on the previous boards. This was then possible - it was made to work but it never came into service here because it would only run safely at about 7 megahertz and not 10 megahertz mainly due to doubtful specifications by manufacturers. Both of these boards have a single chip which does the hard part of the Cambridge ring. This fat transformer is still used for generating the power supply for the board from the ring and this is a transistor and as you can see it has a large heat sink on because it handles the power to supply the rest of the board.
Q: So these boards are from the later life of the ring?
DW: When the ring was in service it was thought you could replace the entire board by a single integrated circuit which was possible. We went to an extraordinary amount of trouble. One manufacturer failed and another manufacturer refused to manufacture them, and so there was a lot of hassle and they were never really satisfactory. They turned up too late to be really useful.
Q: So these boards would date from roughly when?
DW: Probably about 2 - 5 years after the Ring started. I'm not quite sure about these. Certain manufacturers went into manufacture for Ring components and there was a specification by British standards to which they adhered.
See also: 35/97
See also: 103/99


Number of matches = 2 Copyright University of Cambridge Computer Laboratory, 1999. All rights reserved.